Juliet’s House in Verona, Italy

Juliet's House in Verona, Italy.
The balcony on the side of Juliet’s House in Verona, Italy.
Juliet's House in Verona, Italy.
The sculpture of Juliet attracts a lot of attention.
Juliet's House in Verona, Italy.
Heading through a small tunnel toward’s Juliet’s house.
Juliet's House in Verona, Italy.
Thousands of people have left their mark on this wall.
Juliet's House in Verona, Italy.
QUESTE FURONO LE CASE DEI CAPULETI D’ONDE USCI LA GIULIETTA PER CUI TANTO PIANSERO I CUORI GENTILI E I POETI CANTARONO.

Adige River in Verona, Italy

Adige River in Verona, Italy.
Adige River in Verona, Italy.

The Adige  is the second longest river in Italy after the Po, rising in the Alps in the province of South Tyrol near the Italian border with Austria and Switzerland, flowing 410 kilometres (250 mi) through most of North-East Italy to the Adriatic Sea.

Adige River in Verona, Italy.
Adige River in Verona, Italy.

The river sources near the Reschen Pass (1,504 metres (4,934 ft)) close to the borders with Austria and Switzerland above the Inn valley. It flows through the artificial alpine Lake Reschen. The lake is known for the church tower that marks the site of the former village of Alt Graun (“Old Graun”); it was evacuated and flooded in 1953 after the dam was finished. Near Glurns, the Rom river joins from the Swiss Val Müstair.

Adige River in Verona, Italy.
Adige River in Verona, Italy.

The Adige runs eastbound through the Vinschgau to Merano, where it is met by the Passer river from the north. The section between Merano and Bolzano, is called Etschtal, meaning Adige Valley. South of Bolzano, the river is joined by the Eisack and turns south through a valley which has always been one of the major routes through the Alps, connecting the Reschen and the Brenner passes, at 1,370 metres (4,490 ft) considered the easiest of the main Alpine passes.

Adige River in Verona, Italy.
Adige River in Verona, Italy.

The Chiusa di Salorno narrows at Salorno mark the southernmost part of the predominantly German-speaking province of South Tyrol. The Adige was mentioned in the “Lied der Deutschen” of 1841 as the southern border of the German language area (which it still is). In 1922 Germany adopted the song as its national anthem, although by that time Italy had taken control of all of the Adige.

Adige River in Verona, Italy.
Adige River in Verona, Italy.

Near Trento, the Avisio, Noce, and Fersina rivers join. The Adige crosses Trentino and later Veneto, flowing past the town of Rovereto, the Lagarina Valley, the cities of Verona and Adria and the north-eastern part of the Po Plain into the Adriatic Sea. The Adige and the Po run parallel in the river delta without properly joining.

Adige River in Verona, Italy.
Adige River in Verona, Italy.

The Adige is connected to Lake Garda by the Mori-Torbole tunnel, an artificial underground canal built for flood prevention.

Adige River in Verona, Italy.
Adige River in Verona, Italy.

The Adige is a home to the marble trout (Salmo marmoratus), but at far lower populations than in the past. Fish stocking is one of the most significant causes of the sharp reduction in the original (indigenous) fish population of this subspecies. It will spawn with and interbreed with brown trout, which are regularly stocked in the river and its tributaries. Source: Wikipedia.

Adige River in Verona, Italy.
Adige River in Verona, Italy.
Adige River in Verona, Italy.
Adige River in Verona, Italy.
Adige River in Verona, Italy.
Adige River in Verona, Italy.

Walking Through Balzers, Liechtenstein

Balzers, Liechtenstein
Clouds playing with the mountaintops in Balzers, Liechtenstein

The proof of continuous settlement in Balzers can be found from the early Stone Age (about 3000 B.C.), to the modern day.

Historically, the present-day form of the village consists of two different villages, the actual Balzers in the east and Mäls in the west. Not visible to the unaware, the division still persists in the local village culture, where it manifests in half-serious local competition. Some customs, such as the “Funken” a springtime ritual with pre-Christian origins involving a huge bonfire, are still being practised by each separately. The two parts were first mentioned in 842 as Palazole.

Balzers, Liechtenstein
Pleasant suburban neighborhood in Balzers, Liechtenstein.

In the northern part of the village archaeologists found the foundations of Roman buildings in 1933 and 1967. The finds included sixty Roman coins (from 46-42 B.C.) that point to the Roman rule of Balzers, highlighting the history of the twin villages of Balzers and Mäls, where the Rätische Mäls is the older of the ‘twins’. While “Meilis”, as Mäls is called in the Rätic language, cannot so far be interpreted etymologically, the name Balzers (Palazoles) can be linked with the Latin “palatium” (Lordship, Pfalz).

Balzers, Liechtenstein
Crosswalk in Balzers, Liechtenstein.

Since subjecting the Rätians (15 B.C.) to the “Imperium Romanum” the location as a “village on the Knights road” has shaped the Balzner history, since the road led across the alpine Julier and Spluegen passes along the mountain-slope through the village. Balzers experienced rapid development in the twentieth century – a testament to the continued importance of its location.

Balzers, Liechtenstein
Blooming bush in Balzers, Liechtenstein.

The archaeological finds of 1934 at the south foot of the Gutenberg castle hill provided the most southerly discovery of the “Rössener culture.” Early and the late Bronze Age remains have also been found around Gutenberg.

Balzers is the home of the Burg Gutenberg, a 12th-century castle which is located on a rocky hill in the center of the town.

Balzers, Liechtenstein
Thanks for visiting Balzers, Liechtenstein with me!

Whilst it only has 4,368 inhabitants, the village has seen a rapid industrialisation. Balzers is the southernmost village in Liechtenstein and is approximately 472 m above sea level with an area of 19.6 square km. With its important and interesting historical past, the village has felt obliged to continue to care for its environment. The village council therefore promises that each inhabitant is ensured a healthy life in a beautiful environment. Source: Wikipedia and About Liechtenstein.

View From Mürren

 

Mürren is a traditional Walser mountain village in Bernese Highlands, Switzerland, at an elevation of 1,638 metres (5,374 ft) above sea level and unreachable by public road. Tourism is popular through the summer and winter; the village features a view of the three towering mountains: Eiger, Mönch, and Jungfrau. Mürren has a population of just 450, but has 2,000 hotel beds.

Mürren has its own school and two churches, one Reformed and one Roman Catholic. Source: Wikipedia.

The Bessières Bridge

While in Lausanne, Switzerland, this summer, I enjoyed the views and photographic opportunities that the Bessières Bridge gave me. It didn’t hurt that the weather was beautiful at the time.

Pont Bessieres, Lausanne, Switzerland.
The architectural structure of Pont Bessieres can be well seen from this viewpoint.

The Bessières Bridge, the furthest upstream of the three bridges on the Flon Valley, was built from 1908 to 1910 and connects the City hill, the cantonal administrative centre, to Rue Caroline and the city’s eastern neighbourhoods. The construction of a bridge in this area had been discussed for decades.

Pont Bessieres, Lausanne, Switzerland.
The side of Pont Bessieres, Lausanne.

In 1839, the initial plan was for a suspension bridge. The banker and jeweller Charles Bessières donated 500,000 francs in 1901, and his brother Victor donated 50,000 francs in 1908 so that the work could finally begin.

Pont Bessieres, Lausanne, Switzerland.
View towards the Cathedral from Pont Bessieres, Lausanne.

In 1899, a contest awarded the work to the architect Eugène Jost. His plan featured neo-medieval turrets similar to the Cathedral at the entrances to the bridge, but it was then determined that they would be too costly. The bridge was finally adorned with 11-metre high obelisks and given a Louis 16th style to match the old neoclassical hospital nearby.

Pont Bessieres, Lausanne, Switzerland.
View of Lausanne from Pont Bessieres.

The deck has a metal arch with an 80-metre opening that leads to two stone arches. Its total length is 120 metres. As of 2008, the Bessières Bridge is home to an m2 metro station. Source: lausanne.ch

Pont Bessieres, Lausanne, Switzerland.
Early summer day on the Pont Bessieres in Lausanne.

Tamara Lempicka: Polish Art Deco Painter, First Artist/”Glamour Star”

Painting by Tamara Lempicka

Tamara Łempicka, commonly known as #Tamara De Lempicka (16 May 1898 – 18 March 1980), was a #Polish #Art Deco #painter and “the first woman artist to be a glamour star”. Influenced by #Cubism, #Lempicka became the leading representative of the Art Deco style across two continents, a favorite artist of many Hollywood stars, referred to as ‘the baroness with a brush’.

She was the most fashionable #portrait #painter of her generation among the aristocracy, painting duchesses and grand dukes and socialites. Through her network of friends, she was also able to display her paintings in the most elite salons of the era.

Lempicka was criticized as well as admired for her ‘perverse Ingrism’, referring to her modern restatement of the master Jean Auguste Dominique #Ingres, as displayed in her work Group of Four Nudes (1925) among other studies. Source: Wikipedia.

Exploring The River Liffey


From The River Liffey. Posted by Bogdan Migulski on 10/12/2016 (5 items)

Generated by Facebook Photo Fetcher 2


Quadriga with Fat Crescent Moon

This quadriga on top of the Brandenburg Gate is much more impressive as the night moves in, making the cloudy sky a beautiful mix of blues and pinks. Also, that is when the lights pointing at the work of art are turned on, creating a nice glow. Behind the Gate is the famous Tiergarten of Berlin—an expansive park excellent for walks and biking.

A quadriga (Latin quadri-, four, and iugum, yoke) is a car or chariot drawn by four horses abreast (the Roman Empire’s equivalent of Ancient Greek tethrippon). It was raced in the Ancient Olympic Games and other contests. It is represented in profile as the chariot of gods and heroes on Greek vases and in bas-relief. The quadriga was adopted in ancient Roman chariot racing.

They were emblems of triumph; Victory and Fame often are depicted as the triumphant woman driving it. In classical mythology, the quadriga is the chariot of the gods; Apollo was depicted driving his quadriga across the heavens, delivering daylight and dispersing the night. Source: Wikipedia.