Democrats Lack Enthusiasm for Voting

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Gallup:

PRINCETON, NJ — In thinking about the 2012 presidential election, 45% of Democrats and independents who lean Democratic say they are more enthusiastic about voting than usual, while nearly as many, 44%, are less enthusiastic. This is in sharp contrast to 2008 and, to a lesser extent, 2004, when the great majority of Democrats expressed heightened enthusiasm about voting.

Pennsylvania May Do Away With Winner-Takes-All in Electoral College

Pileggi says he wants to change that “winner-take-all system,” and guide the system used in Maine and Nebraska through Pennsylvania’s Legislature this fall, before the 2012 presidential votes are cast. Republicans in both chambers say the bill has a strong chance of moving fast enough to be approved for next year.

“The system we have now, is a winner-take-all system, the system I am proposing would more precisely conform the electoral college to the popular vote and it would make the presidential election more relevant across the state, give voters more of a sense that they are active participants in the presidential election.”

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Nevada: Sandoval Leads Governor’s Race

Trouble is we don’t know if he’s running.

According to the results of the poll conducted by Washington, D.C.-based Mason-Dixon Polling & Research, Inc., 17 percent of Republican voters would support Gibbons in the primary, well behind 33 percent for Sandoval.
In a Democratic primary that includes Goodman, Reid got support from 13 percent of voters, trailing Buckley’s 25 percent and Goodman’s 34 percent.
Sandoval was the respondents’ favorite candidate in every general election scenario, leading Goodman by 7 percentage points, Buckley by 8 and Reid by 17.

Las Vegas Review Journal

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Generic Congressional Ballot Remains Close This Week

Date Dem GOP
03-01-09 41% 39%
02-22-09 41% 37%
02-15-09 41% 39%
02-08-09 40% 39%
02-01-09 42% 38%
01-25-09 42% 35%
01-18-09 42% 35%
01-11-09 42% 36%
12-31-08 43% 37%
12-21-08 44% 36%
12-14-08 42% 37%
12-07-08 42% 38%
11-30-08 43% 40%
11-23-08 44% 39%
11-16-08 42% 38%
11-09-08 43% 41%
11-02-08 47% 41%
10-26-08 47% 40%
10-19-08 45% 39%
10-12-08 46% 38%
10-05-08 45% 37%
09-28-08 46% 37%
09-21-08 45% 38%
09-14-08 44% 38%
09-07-08 45% 37%
08-31-08 46% 36%
08-24-08 46% 35%
08-17-08 46% 36%
08-10-08 45% 37%
08-03-08 46% 36%
07-27-08 47% 34%
07-20-08 45% 36%
07-13-08 46% 36%
07-06-08 47% 34%
06-29-08 47% 35%
06-22-08 47% 34%
06-15-08 48% 34%
06-08-08 47% 34%
05-22-08 47% 39%
04-29-08 46% 41%
04-06-08 43% 37%
03-13-08 44% 40%
02-14-08 44% 40%
01-15-08 43% 38%
12-09-07 46% 36%
11-04-07 46% 35%
10-04-07 48% 36%
09-04-07 50% 32%
08-01-07 47% 37%
07-17-07 46% 37%
06-21-07 46% 34%
05-31-07 45% 38%
05-03-07 47% 36%
04-10-07 45% 35%

Source: Rasmussen Reports

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Even Washington Post Admits Palins Saved McCain From Worse Loss

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Love her or loathe her, the data appear somewhere close to conclusive that Palin did little to help — and, in fact, did some to hurt — McCain’s attempts to reach out to independents and Democrats. But just because Palin doesn’t appear to have helped McCain move to the middle doesn’t mean that picking her was the wrong move. Remember where McCain found himself this past summer. He had won the Republican nomination, but the GOP base clearly felt little buy-in into his campaign. A slew of national polls reflected that energy gap, with Democrats revved up about the election and their candidate and Republicans somewhere between tepid and glum. Enter Palin, who was embraced with a bear hug by the party’s conservative base. All of a sudden, cultural conservatives were thrilled at the chance to put “one of their own” in the White House. In fact, of the 60 percent of voters who told exit pollsters that McCain’s choice of Palin was a “factor” in their final decision, the Arizona senator won 56 percent to 43 percent. For skittish conservatives looking for more evidence that McCain understood their needs and concerns, Palin did the trick. It’s hard to imagine conservatives rallying to McCain — even to the relatively limited extent that they did — without Palin on the ticket. And without the base, McCain’s loss could have been far worse.
Source: Washington Post